Speaker:王姿文
Date:2016-01-27
view(s): 671
  • 00:07 1.
    18
  • 00:47 2.
    Overview: Reading the Leaves from the Tree of Life
  • 00:30 3.
    Genomics is the study of whole sets of genes and their interactions Bioinformatics is the application of computational methods to the storage and analysis of biological data
  • 00:00 4.
    Concept 18.1: The Human Genome Project fostered development of faster, less expensive sequencing techniques
  • 00:41 5.
    Concept 18.1: The Human Genome Project fostered development of faster, less expensive sequencing techniques
  • 00:01 6.
    Figure 18.2-3
  • 01:03 7.
    Figure 18.2-3
  • 00:43 8.
    The whole-genome shotgun approach was developed by J. Craig Venter and colleagues This approach starts with cloning and sequencing random DNA fragments Powerful computer programs are used to assemble the resulting short overlapping sequences into a single
  • 00:48 9.
    The whole-genome shotgun approach is widely used today Newer sequencing techniques, called sequencing by synthesis, have resulted in massive increases in speed and decreases in cost of sequencing entire genomes These sensitive techniques allow direct sequ
  • 00:55 10.
    The new sequencing techniques have facilitated an approach called metagenomics In this approach, DNA from a group of species in an environmental sample is collected and sequenced Computer software sorts out the partial sequences and assembles them into t
  • 00:45 11.
    Concept 18.2: Scientists use bioinformatics to analyze genomes and their functions
  • 01:04 12.
    Centralized Resources for Analyzing Genome Sequences
  • 00:34 13.
    GenBank, the NCBI database of sequences, doubles its data approximately every 18 months Software is available that allows online visitors to search GenBank for matches to A specific DNA sequence A predicted protein sequence Common stretches of amino acids
  • 00:54 14.
    GenBank, the NCBI database of sequences, doubles its data approximately every 18 months Software is available that allows online visitors to search GenBank for matches to A specific DNA sequence A predicted protein sequence Common stretches of amino acids
  • 01:04 15.
    Figure 18.3
  • 00:02 16.
    Identifying the Functions of Protein-Coding Genes
  • 00:43 17.
    Identifying the Functions of Protein-Coding Genes
  • 01:23 18.
    Understanding Genes and Gene Expression at the Systems Level
  • 01:28 19.
    Systems Biology
  • 01:24 20.
    Application of Systems Biology to Medicine
  • 00:26 21.
    Figure 18.4
  • 01:17 22.
    Concept 18.3: Genomes vary in size, number of genes, and gene density
  • 02:19 23.
    Table 18.1
  • 01:00 24.
    Concept 18.4: Multicellular eukaryotes have much noncoding DNA and many multigene families
  • 01:04 25.
    Intergenic DNA is noncoding DNA found between genes Pseudogenes are former genes that have accumulated mutations and are now nonfunctional Repetitive DNA is present in multiple copies in the genome About three-fourths of repetitive DNA is made up of trans
  • 01:15 26.
    Transposable Elements and Related Sequences
  • 00:47 27.
    Figure 18.6
  • 01:44 28.
    Movement of Transposons and Retrotransposons
  • 00:59 29.
    Figure 18.8
  • 01:20 30.
    Concept 18.5: Duplication, rearrangement, and mutation of DNA contribute to genome evolution
  • 00:33 31.
    Alterations of Chromosome Structure
  • 01:00 32.
    Figure 18.10
  • 01:08 33.
    Figure 18.11
  • 00:22 34.
    Figure 18.10
  • 00:14 35.
    Figure 18.11
  • 02:30 36.
    Concept 18.6: Comparing genome sequences provides clues to evolution and development
  • Index
  • Notes
  • Discuss
  • Fullscreen
genomes and their evolution
Duration: 33:11, Browse: 671, Update: 2020-08-24
    • 00:07 1.
      18
    • 00:47 2.
      Overview: Reading the Leaves from the Tree of Life
    • 00:30 3.
      Genomics is the study of whole sets of genes and their interactions Bioinformatics is the application of computational methods to the storage and analysis of biological data
    • 00:00 4.
      Concept 18.1: The Human Genome Project fostered development of faster, less expensive sequencing techniques
    • 00:41 5.
      Concept 18.1: The Human Genome Project fostered development of faster, less expensive sequencing techniques
    • 00:01 6.
      Figure 18.2-3
    • 01:03 7.
      Figure 18.2-3
    • 00:43 8.
      The whole-genome shotgun approach was developed by J. Craig Venter and colleagues This approach starts with cloning and sequencing random DNA fragments Powerful computer programs are used to assemble the resulting short overlapping sequences into a single
    • 00:48 9.
      The whole-genome shotgun approach is widely used today Newer sequencing techniques, called sequencing by synthesis, have resulted in massive increases in speed and decreases in cost of sequencing entire genomes These sensitive techniques allow direct sequ
    • 00:55 10.
      The new sequencing techniques have facilitated an approach called metagenomics In this approach, DNA from a group of species in an environmental sample is collected and sequenced Computer software sorts out the partial sequences and assembles them into t
    • 00:45 11.
      Concept 18.2: Scientists use bioinformatics to analyze genomes and their functions
    • 01:04 12.
      Centralized Resources for Analyzing Genome Sequences
    • 00:34 13.
      GenBank, the NCBI database of sequences, doubles its data approximately every 18 months Software is available that allows online visitors to search GenBank for matches to A specific DNA sequence A predicted protein sequence Common stretches of amino acids
    • 00:54 14.
      GenBank, the NCBI database of sequences, doubles its data approximately every 18 months Software is available that allows online visitors to search GenBank for matches to A specific DNA sequence A predicted protein sequence Common stretches of amino acids
    • 01:04 15.
      Figure 18.3
    • 00:02 16.
      Identifying the Functions of Protein-Coding Genes
    • 00:43 17.
      Identifying the Functions of Protein-Coding Genes
    • 01:23 18.
      Understanding Genes and Gene Expression at the Systems Level
    • 01:28 19.
      Systems Biology
    • 01:24 20.
      Application of Systems Biology to Medicine
    • 00:26 21.
      Figure 18.4
    • 01:17 22.
      Concept 18.3: Genomes vary in size, number of genes, and gene density
    • 02:19 23.
      Table 18.1
    • 01:00 24.
      Concept 18.4: Multicellular eukaryotes have much noncoding DNA and many multigene families
    • 01:04 25.
      Intergenic DNA is noncoding DNA found between genes Pseudogenes are former genes that have accumulated mutations and are now nonfunctional Repetitive DNA is present in multiple copies in the genome About three-fourths of repetitive DNA is made up of trans
    • 01:15 26.
      Transposable Elements and Related Sequences
    • 00:47 27.
      Figure 18.6
    • 01:44 28.
      Movement of Transposons and Retrotransposons
    • 00:59 29.
      Figure 18.8
    • 01:20 30.
      Concept 18.5: Duplication, rearrangement, and mutation of DNA contribute to genome evolution
    • 00:33 31.
      Alterations of Chromosome Structure
    • 01:00 32.
      Figure 18.10
    • 01:08 33.
      Figure 18.11
    • 00:22 34.
      Figure 18.10
    • 00:14 35.
      Figure 18.11
    • 02:30 36.
      Concept 18.6: Comparing genome sequences provides clues to evolution and development
    Location
    Folder name
    普通生物學
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    王姿文
    Division
    生科系
    Create
    2016-01-27 10:25:28
    Update
    2020-08-24 23:39:51
    Browse
    671
    Duration
    33:11